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FAQ

Naviguer vers le Canada avec la FAQ d'Encubate

Our FAQs

Bienvenue sur la page FAQ d'Encubate, votre guide complet pour naviguer dans les subtilités de l'immigration canadienne. Nous abordons ici les questions et préoccupations courantes auxquelles sont confrontés les individus, les familles et les entreprises qui cherchent à faire du Canada leur nouveau pays ou à explorer diverses opportunités dans le pays. Notre équipe de consultants en immigration expérimentés a organisé cette ressource pour vous fournir clarté et conseils tout au long de votre parcours d’immigration. Que vous soyez un étudiant potentiel, un professionnel qualifié, un investisseur commercial ou un parrain familial, nos FAQ couvrent un large éventail de sujets pour vous aider à mieux comprendre le processus d'immigration, les exigences et les options qui s'offrent à vous. Explorez nos catégories de FAQ ci-dessous pour trouver des réponses à vos questions spécifiques, et n'hésitez pas à nous contacter si vous avez besoin d'aide supplémentaire.

  • Can you help me sponsor a family member to come to Canada?
    Yes, we offer assistance with family sponsorship applications for Canadian citizens and permanent residents looking to sponsor eligible family members to come to Canada. Whether you are sponsoring a spouse, child, parent, or other eligible relative, our team can guide you through the sponsorship process and help you reunite with your loved ones in Canada.
  • Who are your services for?
    Our services are tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals, families, and businesses interested in immigrating to Canada or seeking assistance with various immigration matters. Whether you are a skilled professional, a student, a business owner, or a family member looking to reunite with loved ones in Canada, our team of experienced immigration consultants is here to help.
  • What is an RCIC registered agent, and how can I verify their credentials?
    An RCIC registered agent is a licensed professional who specializes in Canadian immigration law and is authorized to represent clients in immigration matters. To verify the credentials of an RCIC registered agent, you can visit the official website of the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants (CICC), the regulatory body responsible for overseeing RCICs. On the CICC website, you can search for the agent's name to confirm their licensing status and ensure they are in good standing with the regulatory authority. It's crucial to engage the services of a licensed RCIC agent to ensure you receive accurate and reliable immigration advice and representation throughout the application process. Working with a licensed professional provides an added layer of protection and ensures that your immigration matters are handled ethically and professionally.
  • How do I pay Encubate for consultations and services?
    When making a payment for our services, you have the option to use our online payment methods such as credit cards, debit cards, Apple Pay, Google Pay, PayPal, etc. However, if you encounter any issues with these options, you can proceed with a manual offline payment. Inside Canada: If you are located within Canada, you can send an e-transfer to pay@encubate.ca. If you have received an invoice from Encubate, enter the invoice number in the transfer description. Otherwise, please use your full name in the transfer description. Outside Canada: For clients located outside Canada, you can make your payment using Flywire. Please use the following instructions to complete the payment process through Flywire. Visit the Flywire payment website using the following link: https://pay.flywire.com Type "Encubate" in the search bar to locate our company name, then select "Encubate Immigration Services" to proceed. Choose your country of payment origin and enter the amount (in Canadian Dollars) provided by Encubate. Choose your preferred payment method. Please note that payment options may vary depending on your country of origin. Enter all required payer information such as your full name, email address, phone number, and mailing address. If you have received an invoice from Encubate, enter the invoice number. Otherwise, please use your full name as the invoice number. If you have any questions or need further assistance regarding the payment process, feel free to contact your dedicated account manager at Encubate.
  • How long does the immigration process take?
    The processing times for immigration applications vary depending on the type of application, the immigration program you are applying under, and other factors such as the volume of applications being processed and any additional requirements or requests from immigration authorities. Our team will provide you with an estimated timeline for your specific case during the consultation process and keep you informed of any updates or developments as your application progresses.
  • What is the consultation process like?
    During the consultation process, one of our experienced immigration consultants will meet with you to discuss your immigration goals, assess your eligibility for various immigration programs, and provide personalized recommendations based on your individual circumstances. We will answer any questions you may have and work with you to develop a customized immigration strategy that aligns with your goals and objectives.
  • Do you offer assistance with visa applications?
    Yes, we provide comprehensive assistance with visa applications for individuals, families, and businesses. Whether you are applying for a visitor visa, study permit, work permit, or any other type of visa, our team of experienced immigration consultants can help you navigate the application process and maximize your chances of success.
  • How much does your services cost?
    The cost of our services varies depending on the complexity of your immigration case and the specific services you require. We offer transparent pricing and will provide you with a detailed breakdown of all costs associated with your case during the consultation process. Our goal is to provide you with high-quality immigration services at fair and competitive rates.
  • What is Encubate?
    Encubate is a licensed immigration consultancy firm based in Canada. We specialize in providing comprehensive immigration services to individuals, families, and businesses seeking to immigrate to or navigate the Canadian immigration system.
  • How can I verify that Encubate is a licensed immigration consultancy?
    Ensuring that you are working with a licensed immigration consultancy is crucial for your peace of mind and the success of your immigration journey. At Encubate, we are proud to be a licensed immigration consultancy regulated by the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants (CICC). To verify our licensing status and ensure that we are authorized to provide immigration services, you can visit our website's "Credentials" page. This page contains step-by-step instructions on how to check the status of our Registered Canadian Immigration Consultants (RCICs) with the CICC. By verifying our licensing status, you can trust that you are working with a reputable and trustworthy immigration consultancy that adheres to the highest standards of professionalism and ethics.
  • What types of services do you offer?
    We offer a wide range of immigration services, including but not limited to visa applications, immigration program consultations, citizenship applications, family sponsorship, skilled worker programs, and business immigration services. Our team provides personalized guidance and support to clients throughout the entire immigration process.
  • How can I get started with Encubate?
    To get started with Encubate, simply reach out to our team to schedule a consultation. During the consultation, we will assess your immigration needs, discuss your options, and develop a personalized immigration strategy tailored to your unique circumstances. Our goal is to provide you with the guidance and support you need to navigate the immigration process successfully.
  • What is the role of an agent, and should I hire one?
    An agent is an individual or organization that provides assistance and advice on visa matters, often for a fee. However, it's important to note that only licensed professionals, such as Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants (RCICs), are authorized to provide immigration advice and represent clients before the Canadian government. Hiring an RCIC ensures that you receive accurate and reliable guidance throughout the immigration process. Additionally, RCICs are held to high ethical and professional standards enforced by the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants (CICC), providing an added layer of protection for clients. Before engaging the services of an agent, it's essential to verify their credentials and ensure that they are licensed by the appropriate regulatory body. If you have any doubts or concerns about the legitimacy of an immigration agent, it's recommended to seek assistance from a licensed RCIC instead.
  • What is a Service Agreement, and why is it important?
    A Service Agreement is a legally binding contract enforced by the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants (CICC) on all Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants (RCICs). It must be duly signed between the RCIC and the client before any paid service is provided. This agreement outlines the terms and conditions of the services provided, including the scope of services, fees, payment terms, responsibilities of both parties, and other important information. Having a service agreement is crucial as it helps clarify expectations, protects the rights of both the client and the RCIC, and ensures transparency throughout the immigration process. Before engaging the services of an RCIC, it's essential to review and understand the service agreement thoroughly. If you have any questions or concerns about the contents of the service agreement, don't hesitate to seek clarification from the RCIC.
  • Why should I choose Encubate for my immigration needs?
    At Encubate, we pride ourselves on our expertise, professionalism, and commitment to client satisfaction. Our team of licensed immigration consultants has extensive experience navigating the complexities of the Canadian immigration system. We prioritize our clients' needs and provide tailored solutions to help them achieve their immigration goals.
  • Does Encubate have any RCIC registered agents?
    No, Encubate does not have any registered agents with the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants (CICC). We directly provide visa, immigration, and citizenship consulting services to our clients. Our team consists of licensed immigration consultants who are authorized to represent clients in immigration matters. By working directly with our consultants, clients can ensure they receive personalized and expert guidance throughout the immigration process.
  • What documents do I need to apply for a visitor visa?
    To apply for a visitor visa, you will need a valid passport, proof of funds to support your stay in Canada, a letter of invitation (if applicable), and any additional documents requested by immigration authorities.
  • What are the requirements for a parent or grandparent super visa?
    The parent or grandparent super visa allows eligible parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents to visit Canada for an extended period. Requirements include proof of financial support from the host child or grandchild, medical insurance coverage, and a letter of invitation.
  • Can I work or study in Canada with a visitor visa?
    No, a visitor visa does not allow you to work or study in Canada. If you wish to engage in work or study activities, you must apply for the appropriate permits or visas before coming to Canada.
  • Can I extend my stay in Canada as a visitor?
    Yes, it is possible to extend your stay in Canada as a visitor. You must apply for an extension before your authorized stay expires. Encubate can assist you with the application process and ensure compliance with immigration regulations.
  • Can I visit Canada for business purposes with a visitor visa?
    Yes, you can visit Canada for business purposes with a visitor visa. However, you must ensure that your activities qualify as business visitor activities, such as attending meetings, conferences, or trade shows.
  • How long does it take to process a visitor visa application?
    The processing time for a visitor visa application varies depending on the volume of applications received and other factors. Generally, it can take several weeks to process a visitor visa application, so it is advisable to apply well in advance of your planned travel dates.
  • How long can I stay in Canada as a visitor?
    Visitors to Canada are typically allowed to stay for up to six months per visit. However, the duration of stay granted by immigration officials at the port of entry may vary based on individual circumstances.
  • Do I need a visa to visit Canada as a tourist?
    It depends on your country of citizenship. Citizens of certain countries are exempt from obtaining a visitor visa and can travel to Canada with an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) or visa exemption. However, others may need to apply for a visitor visa before traveling, which is known as a Temporary Resident Visa TRV). Please refer to this link to better understand your visa requirements: Entry requirements by country or territory - Canada.ca
  • Can I apply for a visitor visa while I'm in Canada?
    In most cases, you cannot apply for a visitor visa from within Canada. You must apply from outside Canada, either online or through a visa application center in your country of residence.
  • What is an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA)?
    An Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) is an entry requirement for visa-exempt foreign nationals traveling to Canada by air. It is electronically linked to your passport and is valid for up to five years or until your passport expires, whichever comes first.
  • What is the difference between a study permit and a temporary resident visa (TRV)?
    A study permit authorizes you to study in Canada, while a temporary resident visa (TRV) allows you to enter Canada as a temporary resident. If you require a study permit, you will also need a TRV or Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to enter Canada, depending on your country of citizenship.
  • How do I apply for a study permit?
    To apply for a study permit, you will need an acceptance letter from a Designated Learning Institution (DLI) in Canada, proof of sufficient funds to cover tuition fees and living expenses, a valid passport, and other supporting documents. You can apply online or through a visa application center in your country of residence.
  • Can I work off-campus with a study permit?
    Yes, international students with a valid study permit can work off-campus for up to 20 hours per week during regular academic sessions and full-time during scheduled breaks. However, you must meet certain eligibility criteria and obtain a work permit.
  • If I registered for a 24-week program in Canada, should I apply for a Study Permit?
    For programs that are longer than six months, a Study Permit is required. Similarly, for those studying in Quebec, a CAQ is necessary for programs exceeding six months. However, a Study Permit or CAQ is not mandatory for programs lasting six months or less. In such cases, students can apply for an eTA/TRV, allowing them to study as visitors without a study permit for up to six months. While it's possible to apply for a study permit for a program of six months or less, approval chances are lower compared to longer programs. Students adamant about applying for a study permit for a 24-week program should consider extending the program duration to 26+ weeks to enhance the approval likelihood.
  • Can I work while studying in Canada?
    Yes, international students with a valid study permit are usually allowed to work part-time during their studies and full-time during scheduled breaks, such as winter and summer holidays. However, there may be restrictions depending on the program of study and the type of work.
  • Can I apply for permanent residency after studying in Canada?
    Yes, international students who have completed a program of study at a Canadian institution may be eligible to apply for permanent residency through various immigration programs, such as the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) or Provincial Nominee Program (PNP). A Canadian education and work experience can significantly enhance your eligibility for permanent residency.
  • How can I change my Designated Learning Institution (DLI) online?
    If you are an international student studying in Canada and wish to change your designated learning institution (DLI), you can do so online through the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website. Visit the IRCC website for step-by-step instructions on how to update your DLI information. Ensure that your new institution is a designated learning institution approved by the Canadian government to host international students. Keep in mind that you must inform IRCC of any changes to your study plan to maintain compliance with your study permit conditions.
  • Can I stay in Canada after completing my studies?
    Yes, international students who have completed a program of study at a Canadian institution may be eligible to apply for a Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP). The PGWP allows you to work in Canada for up to three years after graduation, providing valuable work experience and an opportunity to transition to permanent residency.
  • How can I change my status from visitor to student while in Canada?
    If you are currently in Canada as a visitor and wish to study, you may apply to change your status to that of a student. To do so, you must submit an application for a study permit from within Canada (apply for initial study permit) before your visitor status expires. The student must complete a language pathway program (ESL for example) first in order to meet the conditions of admission at a college or university. Here is what needs to take place. The student must apply for a college/university and receive a Conditional Letter of Acceptance (CLOA). The CLOA must mention a Pathway Program prerequisite (ESL for example) to be completed at a language school and also mention a level of ESL to be met. The student must complete the ESL Pathway program at the language school and reach the required level of ESL. The student must obtain a certificate/transcript from the language school confirming that the required level of ESL has been met. The student must obtain from the college/university an Unconditional Letter of Acceptance (ULOA). The student must obtain a Provincial Attestation Letter (PAL) from the college/university. If the student is attending a college/university in Quebec, the student must obtain a Certificat d'Acceptation du Québec (CAQ) from government of Quebec. The student must submit an application for an initial study permit from inside Canada using the college/university ULOA and PAL (CAQ if studying in Quebec). Processing time for the study permit is around 8-12 weeks. The student can start studying for the college/university program on "Maintained Status" while the study permit application is being processed. The student cannot work off campus until the study permit is approved and the college/university program starts.
  • What is a Co-op work permit, and do I need one?
    A Co-op work permit is required for international students participating in a cooperative education or internship program as part of their studies. If your program includes a work placement or internship, you will likely need a Co-op work permit in addition to your study permit.
  • What is the process for extending my study permit?
    If you wish to extend your stay and continue your studies in Canada, you must apply to extend your study permit before it expires. You will need to provide updated enrollment information, proof of funds, and any other required documents.
  • Do I need a study permit to study in Canada?
    Yes, most international students require a study permit to study in Canada. However, there are some exceptions, such as short-term courses or programs lasting six months or less. Please refer to this FAQ if you need more details.
  • Can I bring my family with me to Canada while I study?
    Yes, as an international student, you may be able to bring your spouse, common-law partner, or dependent children with you to Canada. They may be eligible for open work permits or study permits, allowing them to work or study while accompanying you.
  • What is a CAQ, and do I need one to study in Quebec?
    A CAQ, or Certificat d'Acceptation du Québec, is a document issued by the government of Quebec that authorizes foreign nationals to study in the province. If you plan to study in Quebec as an international student, you will typically need to obtain a CAQ in addition to a study permit from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). The CAQ application process involves demonstrating that you have been accepted to a designated learning institution (DLI) in Quebec and that you meet certain eligibility criteria set by the provincial government. You may need to provide proof of financial support, a valid passport, and other supporting documents as part of your CAQ application. Obtaining a CAQ is an important step in the process of studying in Quebec, and it is essential to ensure that you apply for and receive your CAQ before applying for a study permit from IRCC. Failure to obtain a CAQ could result in delays or complications in your study plans.
  • Do I need a work permit to work in Canada?
    In most cases, yes. You typically need a work permit to work in Canada as a foreign worker. However, there are some exceptions, such as individuals covered under international agreements like NAFTA or those eligible for the International Mobility Program (IMP).
  • What is LMIA exemption code C16, and how does it affect work permits?
    LMIA exemption code C16 is designated for individuals participating in the Francophone Mobility Program. This program aims to promote the integration of French-speaking workers into Francophone communities outside of Quebec. Under this exemption, employers seeking to hire French-speaking foreign nationals for eligible positions are not required to obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). Instead, eligible candidates can apply for a work permit directly, provided they meet the specific requirements outlined by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). The C16 exemption streamlines the process for employers and foreign workers, facilitating the recruitment of Francophone talent to support linguistic and cultural diversity in Canada. However, it's essential to ensure that all eligibility criteria are met before proceeding with a work permit application under this exemption category.
  • Can I bring my family with me to Canada while I work?
    Yes, as a foreign worker in Canada, you may be able to bring your spouse, common-law partner, or dependent children with you. They may be eligible for open work permits or study permits, allowing them to work or study while accompanying you.
  • What are the requirements for permanent residency through work experience in Canada?
    Several immigration programs, such as the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) and certain Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs), allow foreign workers with Canadian work experience to apply for permanent residency. The requirements typically include a minimum duration of work experience in Canada, language proficiency, and meeting other eligibility criteria.
  • What is an open work permit, and how can I get one?
    An open work permit allows you to work for any employer in Canada without the need for a specific job offer. You may be eligible for an open work permit through various immigration programs or if you meet specific criteria, such as being the spouse or common-law partner of a skilled worker or international student.
  • Can I extend my work permit in Canada?
    Yes, you can extend your work permit in Canada under certain circumstances, such as if your job offer remains valid, your employer obtains a new LMIA (if required), and you continue to meet the eligibility criteria.
  • What is a NAFTA work permit, and am I eligible?
    A NAFTA work permit is available to citizens of the United States and Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), now known as the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA). It allows professionals from these countries to work in Canada in certain occupations without an LMIA.
  • What are Recognized Organizations (ROs), and how do they relate to work permits?
    Recognized Organizations (ROs) are entities designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to facilitate the issuance of work permits for specific categories of foreign workers. ROs play a crucial role in supporting the Canadian government's efforts to attract and retain skilled workers from around the world. These organizations may include industry associations, professional bodies, or other groups with expertise in particular sectors or occupations. ROs work closely with employers and foreign nationals to ensure that work permit applications meet the necessary criteria and documentation requirements. By partnering with ROs, employers can benefit from streamlined processes for hiring foreign workers, while foreign nationals can access valuable support and guidance throughout the work permit application process. For a complete list of Recognized Organizations and their respective roles and responsibilities, please visit the IRCC website here.
  • Can I obtain a work permit at the Canadian border?
    Yes, in some cases, foreign nationals may be eligible to apply for a work permit at a Canadian port of entry, such as an airport or land border crossing. This process is known as applying for a work permit at the port f entry (POE). To be eligible for a work permit at the border, you must meet certain criteria, including having a job offer from a Canadian employer, possessing the necessary qualifications or credentials for the position, and being admissible to Canada. Additionally, your employer may need to provide a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) or a relevant LMIA exemption, depending on the circumstances of your employment. Applying for a work permit at the border can streamline the process for certain individuals, particularly those who are entering Canada for short-term work assignments or who have already secured employment before arriving in the country. However, it is essential to ensure that you meet all eligibility requirements and have the necessary documentation prepared before attempting to apply for a work permit at the border.
  • What is the difference between the Working Holiday Program and the Young Professionals Program?
    The Working Holiday Program and the Young Professionals Program are both part of the International Experience Canada (IEC) initiative, which allows young people from participating countries to work and travel in Canada. However, there are some key differences between the two programs. The Working Holiday Program is designed for individuals aged 18 to 35 (in most cases) who wish to travel and work in Canada for up to two years. Participants in this program are not required to have a job offer before applying and can work for any employer in Canada. In contrast, the Young Professionals Program is geared towards individuals aged 18 to 35 (in most cases) who have a job offer in Canada that is related to their field of expertise. Participants in this program can work for the same employer in Canada for up to two years, gaining valuable professional experience in their chosen field. Both programs have specific eligibility criteria and application processes, so it is essential to carefully review the requirements for each program before applying.
  • Can I work in Canada without a job offer?
    It is possible to work in Canada without a job offer under certain circumstances, such as through the International Experience Canada (IEC) program, which includes categories like Working Holiday, Young Professionals, and International Co-op. Additionally, some provinces offer immigration streams that do not require a job offer.
  • How do I apply for a work permit in Canada?
    To apply for a work permit in Canada, you typically need a job offer from a Canadian employer, a positive LMIA (if required), and proof of eligibility. You may apply online or through a visa application center, depending on your country of residence.
  • What is the difference between an LMIA and an LMIA-exempt work permit?
    An LMIA (Labour Market Impact Assessment) is a document that employers in Canada may need to obtain before hiring a foreign worker. An LMIA-exempt work permit, on the other hand, allows foreign workers to work in Canada without the need for an LMIA, usually based on specific categories or agreements.
  • What is an LMIA exemption code, and how does it affect my work permit application?
    An LMIA exemption code indicates that a foreign worker is exempt from the requirement to obtain an LMIA before working in Canada. Each code corresponds to specific categories or agreements, such as intra-company transfers, NAFTA/CUSMA professionals, or spouses of skilled workers or international students.
  • What is the Express Entry system, and how does it work?
    The Express Entry system is an online immigration application management system used by the Canadian government to manage applications for permanent residency under the Federal Skilled Worker Program, Federal Skilled Trades Program, Canadian Experience Class, and some Provincial Nominee Programs. Candidates create an online profile, and their eligibility is assessed based on factors such as age, education, work experience, and language proficiency.
  • What happens if my Express Entry profile expires?
    If your Express Entry profile expires and you still wish to be considered for permanent residency in Canada, you will need to create a new profile and meet the eligibility requirements at the time of submission. Your CRS score may change due to updates in your personal information, work experience, education, or language test results.
  • What is the process for obtaining a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) for Express Entry?
    Employers in Canada may need to obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) before hiring a foreign worker through Express Entry. The process involves demonstrating that there are no qualified Canadians or permanent residents available to fill the position and that hiring a foreign worker will not have a negative impact on the Canadian labour market.
  • Can I include my spouse or common-law partner in my Express Entry application?
    Yes, you can include your spouse or common-law partner in your Express Entry application, and their qualifications may contribute additional points to your CRS score. They may also be eligible to apply for an open work permit, allowing them to work for any employer in Canada while your application is being processed.
  • What are the benefits of obtaining a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) nomination?
    A Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) nomination provides additional points toward your Express Entry CRS score, significantly increasing your chances of receiving an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residency. PNPs also offer pathways for individuals with specific skills or work experience needed by certain provinces or territories in Canada.
  • What are the eligibility requirements for the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)?
    To qualify for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, candidates must have at least one year of continuous full-time or equivalent part-time work experience in a skilled occupation, meet the minimum language proficiency requirements in English or French, have their foreign education credentials assessed, and score sufficient points based on factors such as age, education, work experience, language skills, and adaptability.
  • What are the language proficiency requirements for Express Entry?
    Applicants to Express Entry programs must demonstrate proficiency in English or French by providing valid test results from approved language testing organizations. The minimum language proficiency requirements vary depending on the program and occupation, but generally require minimum scores in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.
  • How long does it take to process an Express Entry application?
    Processing times for Express Entry applications vary depending on factors such as the volume of applications received, the completeness of your application, and whether additional information or documents are required. Generally, most applications are processed within six months from the date of submission.
  • What is the Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP), and who is eligible?
    The Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) is for individuals with experience in skilled trades who want to become permanent residents of Canada. To be eligible, candidates must have at least two years of full-time work experience in a skilled trade within the five years preceding the application, meet the language proficiency requirements, and have a valid job offer or certificate of qualification in Canada.
  • How can I improve my Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score?
    There are several ways to improve your CRS score, including obtaining a higher level of education, gaining additional work experience, achieving higher language proficiency test scores, obtaining a job offer supported by an LMIA or LMIA-exempt category, obtaining a provincial nomination, or having a sibling who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.
  • How do I apply for a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) nomination?
    The application process for a PNP nomination varies depending on the province or territory. In most cases, you will need to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) or apply directly to the provincial or territorial government. If selected, you will receive a nomination certificate, which you can use to apply for permanent residency with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).
  • How long does it take to process a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) application?
    Processing times for PNP applications vary depending on the province or territory, the stream under which you apply, and the volume of applications received. Generally, processing times can range from a few months to over a year.
  • What is the proof of funds requirement for NSPNP applicants
    NSPNP – International Graduates In Demand Stream (NSPNP-IGID) has its own financial requirements, that differ based on the location of the applicant. Generally speaking, applicants would need to provide 3-month bank statements to prove to the officer the financial capacity to pay for travel expenses, and costs related to settling in Nova Scotia. IRCC will asses this financial capacity based on the established annual amounts for proof of funds trough this website – the applicant must demonstrate sufficient funds based on their family size: Proof of funds – Skilled immigrants (Express Entry) - Canada.ca. However, for applicants who are already in Nova Scotia and/or have a job offer (which is in call case required for this stream), the officer may reduced the above-mention requirement, and instead, consider the annual income for the job offer used in the application. If that’s the case, applicants must ensure that their expected annual income (or their spouse’s) meets or exceeds Statistics Canada’s Low Income Cut-Off (LICO), which can be found through this website – similar to proof of funds table, applicants must demosntrate sufficient funds based on their family size: Guide 5196: Sponsorship of adopted children and other relatives - Canada.ca. Please note this table is based on annual income and not on total funds available in the applicant’s bank account. Source: International Graduates in Demand Stream Application Guide (novascotiaimmigration.com)
  • What is the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) Express Entry stream?
    Several provinces and territories in Canada have Express Entry-aligned streams within their PNPs, allowing them to nominate candidates who have created an Express Entry profile and meet their specific criteria. Candidates with a provincial nomination through the Express Entry stream receive additional points toward their CRS score.
  • What are the differences between the various Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs)?
    Each province and territory in Canada operates its own PNP, with unique eligibility criteria, streams, and processing times. Some PNPs are employer-driven, while others are based on specific occupations, language proficiency, or ties to the province or territory. It's essential to research the requirements of each program before applying.
  • What is a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), and how does it work?
    Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) are immigration programs operated by Canadian provinces and territories in partnership with the federal government. They allow provinces and territories to nominate individuals who have the skills, education, and work experience needed to contribute to the local economy for permanent residency in Canada.
  • What happens after I receive a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) nomination?
    Once you receive a provincial nomination, you can use it to apply for permanent residency with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). You will need to submit a complete application for permanent residency and undergo medical and security checks as part of the process. Upon approval, you will become a permanent resident of Canada.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)?
    Eligibility criteria for PNPs vary depending on the specific program and province or territory. Generally, applicants must have a job offer from an employer in the nominating province or territory, meet the minimum language proficiency requirements, have the required education and work experience, and demonstrate their intention to live and work in the nominating province or territory.
  • Can I apply to multiple Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) at the same time?
    Yes, you can apply to multiple PNPs simultaneously if you meet the eligibility criteria for each program. However, you will need to demonstrate your intention to live and work in the province or territory to which you are applying, and you may need to withdraw your application from other PNPs if you receive a nomination.
  • What are the benefits of obtaining a provincial nomination?
    A provincial nomination provides additional points toward your Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score, significantly increasing your chances of receiving an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residency. It also offers a streamlined pathway to permanent residency, as provincial nominees often receive priority processing.
  • Can I appeal a decision if my Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) application is refused?
    Yes, most provinces and territories have an appeal process in place for applicants whose PNP applications are refused. The specific procedures and requirements for appeal vary depending on the province or territory, and it's essential to carefully follow the instructions provided by the relevant authority.
  • What is the Business Immigration Program, and who is eligible to apply?
    The Business Immigration Program is designed to attract individuals with business or entrepreneurial experience who can contribute to the Canadian economy. Eligibility criteria vary depending on the specific stream, but generally, applicants must demonstrate a willingness and ability to invest in or establish a business in Canada.
  • What is the Self-Employed Persons Program, and who is eligible to apply?
    The Self-Employed Persons Program is for individuals who have relevant experience in cultural activities, athletics, or farm management and who intend to become self-employed in Canada. To be eligible, applicants must demonstrate experience, intention, and ability to establish themselves in Canada.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Entrepreneur Immigration Program?
    Eligibility criteria for the Entrepreneur Immigration Program vary depending on the province or territory in which you plan to establish or invest in a business. Generally, applicants must have a minimum net worth, provide a business plan, and commit to actively managing the business in Canada.
  • What is the Entrepreneur Immigration Program, and how does it differ from the Start-up Visa Program?
    The Entrepreneur Immigration Program is for individuals who want to start or invest in a business in Canada. Unlike the Start-up Visa Program, which requires support from a designated organization, the Entrepreneur Immigration Program allows applicants to establish a new business or purchase an existing one in Canada.
  • What support is available for Business Immigration Program applicants?
    Business Immigration Program applicants may receive support from designated organizations, business incubators, or government agencies that can provide guidance, mentorship, and resources to help them establish and grow their businesses in Canada.
  • Can I apply to multiple streams under the Business Immigration Program
    Yes, you can apply to multiple streams under the Business Immigration Program if you meet the eligibility criteria for each stream. However, it's essential to carefully review the requirements of each stream and determine which one best aligns with your goals and qualifications.
  • What are the different streams available under the Business Immigration Program?
    There are several streams available under the Business Immigration Program, including the Start-up Visa Program, the Entrepreneur Immigration Program, and the Self-Employed Persons Program. Each stream has its own set of eligibility criteria and requirements.
  • What is the Start-up Visa Program, and how does it work?
    The Start-up Visa Program is designed to attract innovative entrepreneurs who have the potential to build businesses in Canada that can compete on a global scale. To be eligible, applicants must have the support of a designated organization, demonstrate proficiency in English or French, and meet minimum financial requirements.
  • What are the financial requirements for Business Immigration Program applicants?
    Financial requirements for Business Immigration Program applicants vary depending on the stream and the specific circumstances of the applicant. Generally, applicants must demonstrate sufficient funds to support themselves and their families during the establishment and operation of their business in Canada.
  • What are the benefits of obtaining permanent residency through the Business Immigration Program?
    Permanent residency through the Business Immigration Program offers numerous benefits, including access to Canada's universal healthcare system, education system, and social services. It also provides a pathway to Canadian citizenship and the opportunity to live and work anywhere in the country.
  • What is the process for applying for Spousal Sponsorship?
    The process involves the sponsor submitting an application to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), including supporting documents and fees. Once the application is received, IRCC will process it and assess the eligibility of the sponsor and the sponsored spouse or partner.
  • What happens after the Spousal Sponsorship application is approved?
    Once the application is approved, the sponsored spouse or partner will receive permanent resident status in Canada, allowing them to live, work, and study in the country indefinitely. They may also be eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship after meeting certain residency requirements.
  • What documents are required for a Spousal Sponsorship application?
    Required documents typically include proof of the sponsor's status in Canada, proof of the relationship with the sponsored spouse or partner, and various forms and supporting documents to demonstrate eligibility.
  • What is the difference between a spouse and a common-law partner for the purposes of sponsorship?
    A spouse is legally married to the sponsor, while a common-law partner is in a conjugal relationship with the sponsor for at least one year, living together continuously in a marital relationship.
  • How long does it take to process a Spousal Sponsorship application?
    Processing times can vary depending on various factors such as the volume of applications, the completeness of the application package, and the specific circumstances of the case. Generally, it can take several months to process a Spousal Sponsorship application.
  • Can sponsored spouses or partners work or study in Canada while their application is being processed?
    In many cases, sponsored spouses or partners are eligible for an open work permit, allowing them to work for any employer in Canada while their application is being processed. They may also be eligible to study in Canada under certain conditions.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for sponsored spouses or partners?
    Sponsored spouses or partners must be at least 18 years old, not closely related to the sponsor, and not inadmissible to Canada for reasons such as criminality or medical issues.
  • What is Spousal Sponsorship, and who is eligible to sponsor their spouse or partner?
    Spousal Sponsorship is a program that allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor their spouse or common-law partner for immigration to Canada. To be eligible, sponsors must be at least 18 years old, reside in Canada, and meet certain financial and other requirements.
  • What are the obligations of sponsors under the Spousal Sponsorship program?
    Sponsors are financially responsible for their sponsored spouses or partners for a specified period after they become permanent residents. They are also responsible for providing emotional and social support to help their sponsored spouses or partners settle in Canada.
  • What if the sponsored relationship breaks down after the application is approved?
    If the sponsored relationship breaks down after the application is approved but before the sponsored spouse or partner becomes a permanent resident, sponsors may still have obligations under the sponsorship agreement. However, if the sponsored spouse or partner becomes a permanent resident, they retain their status regardless of the relationship status.
  • What is the process for sponsoring a conjugal partner to Canada?
    Sponsoring a conjugal partner to Canada involves demonstrating a genuine and durable relationship with someone of the same or opposite sex who is unable to live with you as a spouse due to circumstances beyond your control, such as immigration restrictions or legal barriers. The process for sponsoring a conjugal partner follows similar guidelines as sponsoring a spouse or common-law partner, but with additional emphasis on proving the nature of the relationship and the reasons for not being able to live together. To sponsor a conjugal partner, you must meet the eligibility requirements set by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), including being a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, demonstrating the ability to provide financial support, and proving the legitimacy of the relationship. You will need to submit documentary evidence of your relationship, such as letters, emails, photos, and affidavits, as well as provide detailed explanations of why you cannot live together. Encubate has extensive experience assisting clients with complex immigration cases, including sponsoring conjugal partners. Our team of experienced immigration consultants can provide personalized guidance and support throughout the sponsorship process, ensuring that your application is prepared accurately and efficiently. Contact us today to discuss your specific situation and learn how we can help you reunite with your conjugal partner in Canada.
  • What is the difference between the Super Visa and the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP)?
    The Super Visa and the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) are both pathways for family reunification in Canada, but they differ in their eligibility criteria, application process, and benefits. The Super Visa is a temporary resident visa that allows parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens or permanent residents to visit Canada for an extended period, typically up to two years per entry, without the need for renewal. It is designed for individuals who wish to visit their family members in Canada on a temporary basis. On the other hand, the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) is a permanent residency program that enables eligible Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor their parents and grandparents to immigrate to Canada as permanent residents. Successful applicants under the PGP receive permanent resident status, allowing them to live, work, and study in Canada indefinitely and access healthcare and social benefits. While the Super Visa offers the flexibility of temporary visits, the PGP provides the opportunity for parents and grandparents to obtain permanent residency and establish roots in Canada. The choice between the two options depends on the individual's long-term immigration goals and circumstances.
  • Can other family members be sponsored for immigration to Canada?
    Yes, Canadian citizens and permanent residents can sponsor certain other family members, including dependent children, parents, and grandparents, for immigration to Canada under the Family Class sponsorship program.
  • Can sponsored family members work or study in Canada while their application is being processed?
    In many cases, sponsored family members are eligible for open work permits or study permits, allowing them to work or study in Canada while their application is being processed. However, eligibility may vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case.
  • Does the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) have an annual quota for applications?
    Yes, the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) operates with an annual quota or limit on the number of sponsorship applications accepted each year. This quota is determined by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and may vary from year to year based on government priorities, resource availability, and processing capacity. The annual quota system aims to manage the intake of sponsorship applications and ensure a fair and efficient process for both sponsors and applicants. It's advisable to stay informed about the latest updates from IRCC regarding the PGP's annual quota and application procedures.
  • What documents are required for a Family Class sponsorship application?
    Required documents typically include proof of the sponsor's status in Canada, proof of the relationship with the sponsored family member, and various forms and supporting documents to demonstrate eligibility.
  • How long does it take to process a Family Class sponsorship application?
    Processing times can vary depending on various factors such as the volume of applications, the completeness of the application package, and the specific circumstances of the case. Generally, it can take several months to process a Family Class sponsorship application.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for sponsoring dependent children?
    Sponsors must demonstrate that they can financially support the dependent child and meet certain other requirements. The child must also meet certain eligibility criteria, including age and dependency status.
  • How does the Expression of Interest (EOI) system apply to the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP)?
    The Expression of Interest (EOI) system is utilized in the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) to manage applications for sponsoring parents and grandparents to immigrate to Canada. Interested sponsors submit an EOI profile expressing their interest in sponsoring their parents or grandparents, providing details about their eligibility, family ties, and ability to support the sponsored individuals. Canadian immigration authorities then select potential sponsors from the EOI pool based on various factors, including their capacity to fulfill sponsorship requirements and meet financial obligations. Successful candidates may receive an invitation to apply for sponsorship, initiating the process of family reunification through the PGP.
  • Can parents and grandparents be sponsored for immigration to Canada?
    Yes, Canadian citizens and permanent residents may be eligible to sponsor their parents and grandparents for immigration to Canada under the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP), subject to certain eligibility criteria and quotas.
  • What is the process for applying for Family Class sponsorship
    The process involves the sponsor submitting an application to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), including supporting documents and fees. Once the application is received, IRCC will process it and assess the eligibility of the sponsor and the sponsored family member.
  • Who is considered a dependent child for immigration purposes?
    A dependent child is typically defined as an unmarried child under the age of 22 who is financially dependent on their parent or guardian, or who is unable to support themselves due to a physical or mental condition.
  • What are the obligations of sponsors under the Family Class sponsorship program?
    Sponsors are financially responsible for their sponsored family members for a specified period after they become permanent residents. They are also responsible for providing emotional and social support to help their sponsored family members settle in Canada.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for sponsoring parents and grandparents?
    Sponsors must meet certain income requirements and demonstrate their ability to support their parents or grandparents financially. The sponsored parents or grandparents must also meet certain eligibility criteria, including medical and admissibility requirements.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Quebec Skilled Worker Program?
    Eligibility criteria include factors such as education, work experience, language proficiency in French or English, age, and other factors that contribute to successful integration into Quebec society.
  • Do I need a job offer to apply for the Quebec Skilled Worker Program?
    No, a job offer is not required to apply for the Quebec Skilled Worker Program. However, having a job offer or a validated employment offer from an employer in Quebec can increase your chances of being selected.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Quebec Experience Program?
    Eligibility criteria include factors such as completing a study program or acquiring work experience in Quebec, demonstrating knowledge of French, and intending to settle in Quebec.
  • What is the Quebec Experience Program (PEQ)?
    The Quebec Experience Program is a fast-track immigration program for foreign students and temporary workers who have studied or worked in Quebec and wish to settle permanently in the province.
  • How do I apply for Quebec immigration programs?
    The application process varies depending on the program. Generally, it involves submitting an application to the Quebec government, providing supporting documents, attending interviews or assessments, and meeting other requirements specified by the program.
  • What is the Quebec Investor Program?
    The Quebec Investor Program is for individuals who wish to make a passive investment in the province and contribute to its economy. Successful applicants are granted permanent residency in Quebec.
  • What is the Quebec Entrepreneur Program?
    The Quebec Entrepreneur Program is designed for individuals who wish to start a business or acquire an existing business in Quebec and contribute to the province's economic development.
  • What is the Quebec Expression of Interest (EOI) system, Arrima?
    The Arrima platform is Quebec's Expression of Interest system, introduced to manage immigration applications for the Quebec Skilled Worker Program (QSWP). Through Arrima, candidates interested in immigrating to Quebec can submit an Expression of Interest profile, outlining their qualifications, work experience, education, language proficiency, and other factors. The Quebec government then selects candidates from the Arrima pool based on their suitability for the province's labor market needs and other criteria. If selected, candidates may receive an invitation to apply for a Quebec Selection Certificate (Certificat de sélection du Québec, or CSQ), the first step towards permanent residency in Quebec.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Quebec Entrepreneur Program?
    Eligibility criteria include factors such as having managerial experience, possessing sufficient funds to invest in a business in Quebec, and presenting a viable business plan.
  • What are the eligibility criteria for the Quebec Investor Program?
    Eligibility criteria include factors such as having a net worth above a certain threshold, making a prescribed investment in Quebec, and intending to settle in the province.
  • What is the Quebec Skilled Worker Program (QSWP)?
    The Quebec Skilled Worker Program is an immigration pathway for skilled workers who wish to immigrate to Quebec, Canada. It is designed to select candidates based on their ability to become economically established in the province.
  • What is a Quebec Selection Certificate (CSQ)?
    A Quebec Selection Certificate (CSQ) is an official document issued by the Quebec government to candidates who have been selected for immigration to the province. It signifies that the candidate has been approved by Quebec as a skilled worker or other eligible immigrant, based on their qualifications, work experience, language proficiency, and other factors. Obtaining a CSQ is a crucial step in the immigration process for individuals intending to settle in Quebec permanently. Once issued, candidates can then apply for permanent residency with the Government of Canada.
  • Is the citizenship test and ceremony conducted online?
    Yes, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has implemented permanent online procedures for the citizenship test and ceremony. Applicants will take the citizenship test online, and upon successful completion, they may be invited to attend a video oath ceremony, also known as a virtual citizenship ceremony. In some cases, applicants may receive an invitation to an in-person ceremony. These virtual and in-person ceremonies adhere to official guidelines and protocols to ensure the integrity and solemnity of the citizenship process. For the most accurate and up-to-date information on the format of citizenship ceremonies, applicants should consult the official IRCC website or contact their local immigration office.
  • Do I need to give up my current citizenship to become a Canadian citizen?
    Canada allows dual citizenship, so applicants are not required to renounce their previous citizenship(s) to become Canadian citizens. However, some countries may have their own rules regarding dual citizenship.
  • What are the language requirements for Canadian citizenship?
    Applicants must demonstrate adequate proficiency in English or French by providing results of a designated language test. Exemptions may apply for certain age groups or individuals with medical conditions.
  • How many days of physical presence are required to maintain residency in Canada, and how many days are required to become eligible for citizenship?
    To maintain residency in Canada, you must physically reside in the country for at least 730 days (or two years) within the five years immediately preceding your citizenship application. However, to become eligible for Canadian citizenship, you must have accumulated at least 1,095 days (or three years) of physical presence in Canada within the five years preceding your citizenship application. This means that although you need to maintain residency for two years to satisfy the residency requirement, you must have been physically present in Canada for at least three years to meet the eligibility criteria for citizenship.
  • What is the difference between a proof of citizenship application and a citizenship grant application?
    A proof of citizenship application is typically submitted by individuals who were born in Canada or became Canadian citizens through naturalization or adoption but do not have a Canadian citizenship certificate as evidence. This application is used to obtain a citizenship certificate, which serves as official proof of Canadian citizenship. On the other hand, a citizenship grant application is for individuals who have fulfilled the requirements for Canadian citizenship but have never been Canadian citizens before. This includes individuals who have obtained permanent resident status in Canada and meet the residence and language requirements for citizenship. A citizenship grant confers Canadian citizenship upon successful completion of the application process. In summary, while both applications aim to establish Canadian citizenship, the proof of citizenship application is for individuals who already have Canadian citizenship but lack official documentation, while the citizenship grant application is for individuals seeking to become Canadian citizens for the first time.
  • How long does it take to become eligible for Canadian citizenship?
    Generally, adults must have lived in Canada as a permanent resident for at least 1,095 days out of the 5 years before applying. There are exceptions for certain groups, such as refugees and protected persons.
  • Can I include time spent in Canada as a temporary resident toward my citizenship eligibility
    Yes, you can include a portion of the time spent in Canada as a temporary resident towards meeting the residency requirement for Canadian citizenship. However, not all time spent in Canada as a temporary resident counts towards citizenship eligibility. Specifically, each day spent in Canada as a temporary resident counts as half a day, up to a maximum of one year, towards the residency requirement. This means that you can count up to 365 days (or one year) of time spent in Canada as a temporary resident towards meeting the residency requirement for Canadian citizenship.
  • What is the citizenship test, and how do I prepare for it?
    The citizenship test assesses knowledge of Canadian history, values, institutions, and symbols. Study guides and practice tests are available online to help applicants prepare.
  • How long does it take to process a Canadian citizenship application?
    Processing times vary depending on factors such as the volume of applications, completeness of documentation, and complexity of the case. Generally, it takes several months to process an application.
  • Can I apply for citizenship on behalf of my children?
    Parents can include their children as dependents on their citizenship application if the children meet certain criteria. Children under 18 years old do not need to meet the residency requirement.
  • What documents do I need to include with my citizenship application?
    Required documents typically include proof of identity, proof of residency, language test results, and any other supporting documents specified by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).
  • Who is eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship?
    Eligible applicants must have permanent resident status in Canada, have lived in Canada for a specified period, meet language and knowledge requirements, and have filed income taxes, among other criteria.
  • What are the benefits of Canadian citizenship?
    Canadian citizens enjoy various benefits, including the right to vote in federal elections, access to certain government jobs, eligibility for a Canadian passport, and protection under Canadian law.

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